Category Archives: Wyoming

Mountain Meadow Wool Mill

“To revitalize the American wool industry, preserve the West, and create American made high-quality products through eco-friendly operations and fair prices for Ranchers.” I love the mission of this family owned business in Buffalo, Wyoming.

My knitting friends and family members would love the multitude of yarns created on site. Fleece from quality Western growers is processed at the on-site mill producing 100% traceable natural wool products. Visitors can witness the many steps from sorting and cleaning through carding, dying and spinning on 45-minute mill tours offered daily during the summer.

We arrived late in the day after tours were completed but a helpful staff member offered to play a 5-minute video. The next time I’m passing through Buffalo I will definitely plan time for the tour, it all looks fascinating.

When You Go: Mountain Meadow Wool Mill is located at 22 Plains Drive, Buffalo, WY. For mill tours information and gift shop hours check mountainmeadowwool.com or call 307-684-5775.

Day 1 – North to Alberta

From Centennial, Colorado to Buffalo, Wyoming – 445 miles from morning limited visibility to sun still high in the western sky at 8p.m.

Stops along the way:

Southeast Wyoming Welcome Center, I-25 exit 4

The Wyoming Rib & Chop House in Gillette, Wyoming

Mountain Meadow Wool Mill, Buffalo, Wyoming

Sightings of antelope with plenty of room to roam, brown cows, black cows and some really ugly spotted cows, horses, hawks, coal mines, long trains of empty coal cars headed north, trains of filled coal cars headed south, working oil fields, Crazy Woman Creek and miles of green, green grasses.

Thanks Wyoming

Wyoming Rest Stop

In eastern-most Wyoming US85 nearly parallels the historic Cheyenne-Deadwood Stage Route. At Mule Creek Junction we find a roadside rest stop miles from other facilities. It’s time to flex the legs so we pull into the rest area.

 

Rest Stop SignWe discover a modern, well-maintained facility – not only with restrooms but landscaped grounds, a designated pet area, picnic tables and children’s playground. Although this is the crossroads for two US highways, traffic is far less than one finds along Interstates where one would expect such facilities. We’re surprised of the quality we find here.

 

While not a manned information center the building is well supplied with state maps and travel literature. We spend 20 minutes ambling around the area and reading the exterior signs relating stories of Wyoming wildlife, Native Americans, agriculture and that famed Cheyenne-Deadwood Stage Route.

 

Thanks Wyoming!

Day 1 – Hoping for A Great Adventure, Health & Safe Travels

After a slightly frantic getaway we spend the first 90 minutes crawling north on I-25 which reminds us of all the reasons we like to exit the Interstates and travel back roads when the opportunity arises. Looking for routes we’ve never traveled we catch US85 north of Greeley heading for the border. We are soon greeted with “Road Work Ahead” and spend time waiting in line and inching forward.

 

Across the Wyoming line we’re intrigued by acres of sunflowers. Are they destined for roasted seeds, oil or some use unknown to us? Even in the late afternoon light every plant is facing east to greet tomorrow morning’s sun.

 

Day 1 - At WorkWhen checking into the Holiday Inn Express we learn they host an evening reception – free beer, wine and munchies. After our afternoon clean-out-the-refrigerator lunch we’re not interested in sitting down to a full dinner. Veggies and dip, cheese and crackers all we need for an evening snack plus an adult beverage to ease the day’s pace; plus, a fresh baked cookie for bedtime. A perfect welcome to Torrington, Wyoming.

 

I spend the evening planning our itinerary and making reservations for the next few nights. Above all we’re thrilled to be on the road again.

Northwest Road Trip – 2014

Two Weeks Down – Two To Go

Pentax Tetons 2

Can’t believe we’re two weeks into our driving trip to the Pacific Northwest, the first days seem so long ago – so much spectacular country between here and home. Taking a moment to reflect on the 14 days reminds us of all we’ve seen and experienced.

  • 3,050 miles traveled

  • 5 States – Colorado, Utah, Idaho, Montana,

                     Washington

  • 3 Canadian National Parks – Waterton, Banff, Yoho

  • 2 Canadian Providences – Alberta, British Columbia

  • 2 US National Parks – Grand Teton and Glacier

  • 1 Cousin Visit – Thanks Kay

 Lake Louise 2

 

We won’t soon forget seeing two American Bald Eagles while on the Waterton Lake Cruise, a grizzly ambling through a grassy field in Glacier Nt. Park, and a mother brown bear and two cubs chowing down in the same field two days in a row. Never before had we seen a rainbow and its reflection like the one at Emerald Lake.

 

Blue Heron InnAlternating between hotels, Nt. Park lodges, bed and breakfasts and the hospitality of family we’ve been fortunate to have no horror stories of places you would never catch us in again. It had been years since we’d stayed in a Ramada Inn and the memories aren’t great. When we needed lodging in Pincher Creek, Alberta a Ramada looked like the best choice; and I’m sure it was. The room was large, very clean, bed and linens of good quality, front desk staff friendly and efficient. Left this hotel with a new attitude towards the brand.

 

Definitely would return to the three B&Bs we’ve visited – Blue Heron Inn in Rigby, Idaho, Bad Rock B&B in Columbia Falls, Montana and Cromier B&B in Penticton, British Columbia. Each were unique with gracious hosts and gave a more personal experience to their area.

 

Vancouver Highrises

 

No big cities until we arrived in Vancouver today. Listed as the worst travel congestion and most traffic delays in all of Canada we’re quickly reminded of the realities of city life.

 

Arms Reach BistroWe’ve eaten in a variety of restaurants from neighborhood bistros to formal dining rooms (the worst service). I even have to admit to one stop at a McDonalds.We like to focus on local food whenever possible – huckleberries in Montana, saskatoon berries in Alberta, fresh from the orchard plums, pears, apples, artisan cheese and boutique wines in BC’s Okanagan Valley and fresh seafood in Vancouver.

 

Aspen in Yoho

 

Dinosaur digs, jagged mountain peaks, aqua blue glacier-fed rivers, acres of trees heavy with ripening apples, black angus grazing in seemingly endless grasslands, dense forest of towering western red cedar, new mown hay awaiting baling, golden aspen in their fall glory, hillsides covered in rows of vineyards, and rushing rivers, foggy mornings, clouds lying low in mountain valleys, vivid sunrises, a day without a single cloud in the sky, sheets of driving rain – visions captured in photographs and the mind. Memories.

 

Canmore Sunrise

What will the next two weeks reveal?

Fall is Coming

After a Frosty Night

September 13, 2014

 

Autumn is Coming

Along Teton Park Road in Grand Teton National Park

 

We drove by this clump of trees yesterday afternoon about 4:30pm. There was a hint of autumn color change, but only a hint. Early morning temps dropped to around 23 degrees. Viola! The intense change was a shock as we neared this spectacular sight around 2pm today.

 

As I was taking pictures another lady hopped out of her car and said, “They weren’t like this yesterday.” No, but fall is a comin’.

Historic Locomotives–Cheyenne, Wyoming

Engine, Engine – #4004 & #1242

Engine 4004 Side - B

Two railroad relics rest in Cheyenne parks commemorating the importance railroads have played since Cheyenne’s founding. The massive Big Boy steam engine #4004 proudly stands in Holliday Park. The coal-fired Big Boy was designed to pull a 3600-ton train over the steep Union Pacific grads between Cheyenne and Ogden, Utah. Ranked as the world’s largest steam locomotive, Engine #4004 ran from 1941 – 1958 and is one of only eight remaining Big Boys on display in the United States.

Engine 1242 - B

Wyoming’s oldest locomotive is retired to Lions Park on the north end of Cheyenne Botanic Gardens. Nicknamed “Ol’ Sadie” by Union Pacific crews, #1242 was built in 1890 in New Jersey. The coal/steam powdered engine ran the Walcott-Saratoga-Encampment spur line until 1954.

While visiting “Ol’ Sadie” note the unique fence created by Floyd Young, the last engineer to operate the locomotive. In retirement Young collected Western and railroad relics, forming them into a fence around his home. After his death the family donated the fence to the Botanic Gardens to enclose Young’s beloved #1242.

Engine 1242 and Fence - B